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Student Handbook2016 – 2017

Student Code of Conduct and Academic Integrity Handbook

COA Student Handbook

The students of the College of The Albemarle (COA) are viewed as adults and are expected to conduct themselves accordingly. The nature of the college environment requires various rules and regulations to support it. As adults, COA students are responsible, not only to avoid harming the college community, but also to improve it, support it and encourage its growth.

This Student Code of Conduct and Academic Integrity Policy reflects the general principles of behavior accepted by society and by institutions of higher education. It also describes conduct about which COA has made specific statements, rules and regulations.

All COA students (including those involved in Distance Education, the Adult High School, or the High School Equivalency program) are responsible for knowing and following the Student Code of Conduct and all other regulations which are outlined in this document and the College Catalog. Specific sections included in the handbook are distributed to students during orientation, “Welcome Back” student events and/or via email.

A. Safety Exception to Open Door Admissions

COA is an open door community college with the following safety exception: Pursuant 1D SBCCC 400.2 (e) and (f), entitled to Admission to College, COA will refuse admission/readmission to any applicant during the time period prior to being admitted to the college if there is an articulable, imminent, and significant threat to the safety of the applicant and/or another individual. The college defines “admitted” as the end of the application process, which begins with an application and ends when a student attends his/her first class. Once the application process is completed and a student is attending one or more classes, the Student Code of Conduct will apply. To deny admission based on a safety threat, the college must document detailed facts supporting the rationale for denying admission. If admission is refused on the basis of a safety threat the following must be documented:

  1. Detailed facts supporting the rationale for denying admission.
  2. The time period within which the refusal to admit shall be applicable and the supporting rationale for the designated time period.
  3. The conditions upon which the applicant that is refused would be eligible to be admitted.

B. Jeanne Clery Act

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is the federal law, originally known as the Campus Security Act, which requires colleges and universities across the United States to disclose information about crime on and around their campuses. The campus crime log can be found at the Office of the Director of Campus Safety and Security’s (C135) or online at Campus Safety and Security.

C. Violations

Violations of the Student Code of Conduct will be handled directly by the Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management. Certain faculty and/or staff members may immediately restrict access to the college or to certain areas for infractions of the Student Code of Conduct. Such events will be reported to the Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management as soon as practical.

Should a student’s presence on campus create a threat to the safety or well-being of other members of the COA community, the college reserves the right to immediately remove that student from campus.

Students are advised that all campus locations have video cameras in public areas.

All violations of the Student Code of Conduct are documented in the college reporting system — Maxient. Maxient reports are reviewed for repeat or concerning behavior. Concerning behavior may also be reviewed by the college’s Campus Assessment, Response and Evaluation (CARE) Team.

Instances of academic dishonesty will be handled by faculty members in accordance with policies set forth in their syllabi and the Academic Integrity Policy. Students wishing to appeal academic integrity violation decisions made by faculty members should consult the Academic Integrity Policy section of the handbook or the College Catalog for guidelines.

D. Jurisdiction

This Code applies to:

  1. The on-campus conduct of all students and registered student organizations.
  2. The off-campus conduct of students and registered student organizations in direct connection with the use of college resources, including the campus network; academic course requirements, such as internships, field trips, or experiential learning activities; any activity supporting the pursuit of a certificate or degree; any activity sponsored, conducted, or authorized by the college by registered student organizations.
  3. Off-campus conduct that negatively impacts the college, including via social media, such as threats of violence or physical harm, unlawful harassment or other conduct which may have a negative impact or may place its community (inclusive of students, employees or faculty) at risk.
  4. Any activity that causes substantial risk of destruction of property belonging to the college or causes serious risk of harm or endangers the health or safety of members of the college community, including students, staff and members of the public when participating in COA events or activities.
  5. Any conduct that may create a disruption of the educational environment.

A. Rights

Students at COA are afforded various rights along with their responsibilities. Students at COA have the same rights and protections under the Constitutions of the United States and the State of North Carolina as other citizens. These rights are protected regardless of age, race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, disability, political affiliation and/or as any other legally protected class not heretofore mentioned as set forth in COA’s Civil Rights/Non-Discrimination Policy.

Additionally, students have the following rights:

  1. The right to access education and campus facilities.
    • The right to be informed about classroom requirements and college policies and procedures.
    • The right to consistent academic evaluation in relation to other students.
    • Students, official clubs and organizations may use available college facilities according to college policy and procedures.
    • The right to due process in regards to disciplinary concerns, as well as a fair and balanced system for other complaint resolution.
  2. The right to confidentiality of student records.
    • The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records, as outlined on the Student Records web page.
  3. The right to freedom of expression, association and assembly.
    • Students may express their views on college policy or matters of general interest, and may support causes by any orderly means that do not disrupt the operation of the college.
    • In the classroom, students are free to take reasoned exception to the data or views offered and to reserve judgment about matters of opinion, but they are responsible for learning the content of the course.
    • The right to participate in self-governing student bodies which provide channels of communication and means for using democratic processes to solve problems.
    • Students have the right to participate in the institutional governance and policy formation as defined by the appropriate governing body.

B. Responsibilities

The college expects all students to conduct themselves as responsible citizens and members of the academic community. It is the responsibility of each student to know, observe, abide by and adhere to COA’s Student Code of Conduct, rules and regulations. Additionally, students are to abide by all rules applicable to conduct in a classroom environment and at college-sponsored activities. Students, by enrolling in the college, are automatically placed under the rules and regulations established by the college. Therefore, it is the students’ responsibility to familiarize themselves with the rules and regulations affecting them.

When concerns or conflicts arise, it is the institution’s first responsibility to resolve the situation in an informal manner that provides input, comment and resolution between all parties. When this is not possible, the college affords due process to all students, faculty and staff.

C. Terms

  1. Accused Student: Any student accused of violating the Student Code of Conduct.
  2. Business Days: Monday through Friday, excluding days when the college is not open.
  3. College Officials: Senior Administrators and their designees.
  4. Complainant: Any person who submits charges alleging a student violated the Student Code of Conduct who believes s/he/they have been a victim of the misconduct.
  5. Criminal Activity: Any violation of local, state or federal laws.
  6. Distance Education Services: COA resources including faculty, internet or intranet services whether or not directly operated by COA, including Hybrid classes.
  7. On-Campus: All real property and vehicles owned, operated, maintained, controlled or leased by COA.
  8. Property Belonging to COA: All land, buildings, facilities or other grounds or structures, or any item in possession of or owned, used, loaned, leased, maintained or controlled by COA or funded by COA budgets, including computers and network systems, library materials, classrooms and laboratories used for COA purposes.
  9. Student: The term “student” means any person who has been issued a student identification number at COA and is:
    • currently enrolled, or
    • admitted and shown intent to enroll, or
    • withdrawn from a specific course, program, or the college after allegedly violating the Student Code.
  10. Student Group or Organization: A group of students who have been recognized by the college as having a specific affiliation (such as student clubs and organizations, etc.).
All COA students are expected to respect and value the rights of others and conduct themselves as responsible citizens. Choosing to join the COA community obligates each student to abide by a code of civilized behavior. The following personal actions on COA property, as defined herein, at official college functions, or which place students, faculty or employees at risk are prohibited. This following list is not intended to be exhaustive, and the college reserves the right to impose sanctions on students for personal actions which may not be expressly identified.

Note: Certain programs at COA may have conduct and academic integrity and sanction requirements in addition to those listed here. Please consult your program handbook for more information.

A. Code of Conduct Violations

  1. Attempts to Defraud: Dishonesty, fraudulent conduct intended to mislead others and other conduct is prohibited. This includes any activity intended to misrepresent any official document or identification used by or issued by the college.
  2. Bullying: Bullying is the systematic intentional behavior that may take many forms, including but not limited to, repeated unwanted physical, verbal, or written acts which are hostile or legally offensive, targeted at an individual or group and creates an intimidating and/or threatening environment which produces a risk of psychological and/or physical harm. Bullying may manifest as cyber stalking or cyber bullying, as well as excluding behaviors such as ignoring or dismissing individuals or groups.
     
    See the Unlawful Harassment Policy for complete details.

    • Hostile behaviors include, but are not limited to, inappropriate behaviors that are harmful or damaging to an individual and/or property. Behaviors that are intimidating, threatening, disruptive, humiliating, sarcastic, or vicious may also constitute hostile behavior. To be bullying the hostile behavior must be severe and pervasive or have the potential to create a hostile environment which a reasonable individual would perceive as deleterious to the victim’s academic goals.
    • Offensive behaviors may include, but are not limited to, inappropriate behaviors such as abusive language, derogatory remarks, insults, or epithets. Other offensive behaviors may include the use of condescending, humiliating, or vulgar language, swearing, shouting or use of unsuitable language, use of obscene gestures, or mocking. To be bullying the offensive behaviors must be severe and pervasive or have the potential to create a hostile environment which a reasonable individual would perceive as deleterious to the victim’s academic goals.
  3. Classroom Misconduct: All students have the right to learn without interference from others. Faculty members have the authority to protect this right by creating and maintaining an environment that is conducive to learning. Towards this end COA has developed the following Code of Classroom Conduct.
     
    Classroom misconduct is any behavior which disrupts or interferes with the learning experience. Students are required and expected to conduct themselves in a mature and considerate manner. Students should conduct and express themselves in a way that is respectful to all individuals. This includes respecting the rights of others to comment and participate fully in class.
     
    Note: Certain programs at COA may have conduct and academic integrity and sanction requirements in addition to those listed here. Please consult your program handbook for more information.
     
    Examples of Classroom Misconduct: include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Engaging in behavior that disrupts or interferes with the learning experience. Behavior such as, but not limited to, talking in class while the faculty member or other students are speaking, using hateful or threatening speech, or speech which otherwise causes a disturbance, creating distractions or disturbances, sleeping, reading unrelated materials, and moving about the classroom is, in many situations, considered disruptive behavior to the learning process.
    • Using cell phones or other electronic devices that disrupt the learning process or teaching environment is not allowed under most circumstances. The use of personal laptop computers, phones, etc. may be acceptable in some classes; however, they must be used only for note taking or activities in direct support of the course objectives. Faculty members have the right to ask students to shut down any electronic devices.
    • Entering the classroom late or leaving the classroom prior to the end of class is considered a disruption to the learning process and must be avoided unless exceptional circumstances arise.
  4. Complicity in Violating the Student Code of Conduct: Prohibited conduct includes attempting, aiding, abetting, conspiring, hiring or being an accessory to any act prohibited by this Code. If a student has knowledge of another student, individual or group committing or attempting to commit a violation of this Code, he or she is required to remove him or herself from the situation and report it to the college.
  5. Copyright Infringement: Students must respect copyright laws that protect software owners, artists, and writers. Plagiarism in any form will not be tolerated. The use of college resources to infringe upon copyright laws (print, digital, and internet) is prohibited. This applies to all forms of electronic media including, but not limited to, software, electronic encyclopedias, image files, video files and sound files.
  6. Cyber Stalking: Engaging in a course of conduct to communicate, or to cause to be communicated, words, images, or language by or through the use of electronic mail or electronic communication, directed at or about a specific person, causing substantial emotional distress to that person and serving no legitimate purpose.
  7. Cyber Bullying: The willful and repeated harassment and intimidation of a person through the use of electronic or digital technologies, including, but not limited to, email, blogs, texting on cell phones, social websites (e.g., MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc.), chat rooms, “sexting”, instant messaging, or video voyeurism.
  8. Demonstrations and Disruptive Conduct: The First Amendment protects the right to assemble and to petition, but it requires that the right be peaceably exercised in accordance with the law. This right may be exercised by the use of written or spoken words, by acts such as picketing and by “peaceable” mass assemblies and demonstrations, subject to college regulations on time, place and manner of such activity.
     
    The college will not tolerate the deliberate, material, or substantial disruptions of the classroom, college operations work environment or movement of others, nor will it condone violence or physical interference with the facilities or functions of the campus. If protestors (or anti protestors) resort to the use of violence or physical interference, college officials may, without delay, invoke the use of legitimate authority to remove all violators. Disruption may include: disorderly conduct, lewd or indecent behavior, breach of peace, or aiding, abetting or procuring another person to breach the peace on college premises or at functions sponsored by or participated in by the college.
  9. Discrimination: Engaging in discrimination against other students, faculty or staff, college officials, or guests on the basis of age, race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, disability, political affiliation and/or any other legally protected class not heretofore mentioned as set forth in COA’s Civil Rights/Non-Discrimination policy is prohibited in all programs, activities, services, employment and advancement including admissions to, access to, treatment in, or compensation in employment as required by state and federal law.
     
    Students, faculty and staff may participate in religious clubs, activities and organizations that restrict membership and participation to those who share similar religious beliefs only if the club, activity or organization meets the same requirements as any other club, activity or organization.
  10. Dress Code: The college expects all students to dress in a manner in keeping with the academic mission of the college. Students will not be permitted to dress in a manner which disrupts the educational environment. For campus security, students are not permitted to wear clothing or accessories which obscure, conceal or distort the student’s identity, such as masks, hoods, disguises, etc.
     
    Shirts and shoes are required at all times while the student is on campus as well as while attending a COA activity, function, or event off the COA campus.
     
    Certain technical or vocational curricula may require special attire for clinical or laboratory areas. Students enrolled in certain programs must follow the applicable program handbook. A student may not attend classes or laboratory work conducted in the clinical or laboratory areas if such student is in violation of the dress codes for specialty programs that follow program handbook guidelines.
     
    Exceptions may be made when necessary to accommodate genuinely held religious beliefs or as necessary to accommodate students with disabilities. Such requests should be made to the Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management.
  11. Ethical and Acceptable Use of Technology: The use of COA Instructional Technology resources is subject to all federal, state and local laws, and to the college’s applicable policies and guidelines, as outlined in the COA Policy for Responsible Use of Technology Resources.
     
    The following are considered engaging in acts of theft or abuse of computer time or information and are prohibited including, but not limited to:

    • Unauthorized entry into a file to use, read, or change its contents.
    • Unauthorized transfer of a file or files.
    • Unauthorized use of another person’s identification and/or password.
    • Use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of another student, faculty, or college member.
    • Use of computing facilities to view or send obscene materials.
    • Use of computing facilities to interfere with the normal operation of the college computing system.
    • Releasing or exchanging of information and/or codes that are detrimental to the COA environment, equipment, and/or property.
    • Violation of technology usage policies/procedures (published and/or electronically posted).
  12. Gambling: Wagering on the outcome of a contest of others, sporting events or games of chance while on college property or at college sponsored events is prohibited.
  13. Gang Activity: Involvement in gang-related activities which are disruptive to the educational environment is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to, the display of gang symbols, gang paraphernalia, colors, signs, or graffiti. A gang is defined as a group of individuals with identifiable leadership that conspires and acts in concert, mainly for criminal purposes. Behavior on or about college premises or at college-sponsored events that creates conflict or an atmosphere of intimidation, or creates a clear and present danger to life or property, or disrupts orderly operation is prohibited.
  14. Unlawful Harassment: Unlawful Harassment is repeated, malicious mistreatment, verbal abuse, or conduct that is threatening, intimidating, humiliating, insulting, isolates people, or undermines their reputation through verbal or non-verbal communications. Harassment is prohibited. To be harassment, the behavior must be severe and pervasive or have the potential to create a hostile environment which a reasonable individual would perceive as deleterious to the victim’s academic goals.
     
    COA creates an inclusive learning and working environment that recognizes the value and dignity of each person. It is the policy and practice of COA to provide equal educational and employment opportunities regardless of age, race, color, religion, sex/gender, pregnancy, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or political affiliation in all programs, activities, services, employment and advancement including admissions to, access to, treatment in, or compensation in employment as required by state and federal law. See the Unlawful Harassment Policy for complete details.
  15. Hazing: Hazing means any act committed on COA property or in connection with any COA related group or activity that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of an individual (including, without limitation, an act intended to cause degradation, cruelty, or humiliation), or that destroys or removes public or private property, for the purpose of initiation in, admission to, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. Hazing is prohibited by the college.
     
    In response to allegations of hazing under this regulation, it is not a defense that:

    • The victim gave consent to the conduct.
    • The conduct was not part of an official organizational event or sanctioned or approved by the organization.
    • The conduct was not required as a condition of membership in the organization.
  16. Illegal or Unauthorized Possession/Use of Alcohol and Drugs: The unauthorized use, possession, manufacturing or distribution of illegal drugs, controlled substances, look-alike drugs, narcotics, medical marijuana or alcoholic beverages or being under the influence of the same on campus is prohibited. Prohibited conduct includes the use of a prescription drug if the prescription was not issued to the student, and sniffing toxic vapors.
     
    See Substance Abuse Policy for complete details and definitions.
  17. Illegal or Unauthorized Possession/Use of Weapons: Possession, use, control or distribution of any weapons, including, but not limited to; firearms, pellet guns, air pistols/rifles, explosives, dangerous chemicals, knives, stilettos, dirks, brass knuckles, licensed weapons (except as allowed under North Carolina law with a concealed carry permit), objects or instruments possessed for use as a weapon or for direct or indirect delivery to another person for use as a weapon is prohibited.
  18. Indecent or Obscene Behavior: Prohibited behavior includes, but is not limited to, indecent exposure, urinating or defecating in public, outward displays of sexual activity, voyeurism, etc.
  19. Misrepresentation: Students are prohibited from representing or acting on behalf of the college or another individual when not authorized to do so.
  20. Misuse or Unauthorized Possession or Use of Public or Private Property: Prohibited conduct includes, but is not limited to:
    • Theft or the taking or unauthorized use or possession of public or private property or unauthorized use or acquisition of services.
    • Destroying, damaging or littering of any property, conduct that defaces, destroys, damages, or litters any property of the college or any property of an individual or group whether on Campus or at a college function.
  21. Obstruction/Abuse of Student Conduct Process: Students shall not disrupt, interfere with or abuse the student conduct process. Prohibited conduct includes, but is not limited to:
    • Failure to comply with a summons of the Student Code of Conduct Process.
    • Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information.
    • Disruption or interference with the orderly process of a discipline hearing.
    • Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in or use of the Student Disciplinary Appeal process.
    • Attempting to influence the impartiality of a conduct officer or a member of the Student Disciplinary Appeals Committee prior to and/or after a student disciplinary appeal.
    • Verbal or physical harassment and/or intimidation of a conduct officer or a member of Student Disciplinary Appeals Committee, failure to comply with decisions, recommendations or sanctions imposed.
    • Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the conduct process.
  22. Refusal to Identify and/or Comply: Includes disobedience or insubordination toward college officials or designees acting in the performance of their duties. Students are required to produce identification for a college official when asked, specifically their student ID card.
  23. Rioting: Rioting disrupts the educational process, constitutes criminal activity, and is prohibited. Rioting is defined as engaging in, or inciting others to engage in, harmful or destructive behavior in the context of an assembly of persons disturbing the peace on campus, in areas proximate to campus, or in any location when the riot occurs in connection with or in response to a COA sponsored event. Rioting includes, but is not limited to, such conduct as using or threatening violence to others, damaging or destroying property, impeding or impairing fire or other emergency services, or refusing the direction of authorized personnel.
  24. Safety Violations: Engaging in unsafe conduct or compromising the safety of others is prohibited. Conduct which endangers the health or safety of any person(s), including, but not limited to:
    • Intentionally or recklessly starting a fire or causing an explosion.
    • Misusing fire safety equipment, fire escapes or elevators.
    • Intentionally or recklessly endangering the welfare of any individual.
    • Intentionally or recklessly obstructing fire, police, or emergency services.
    • Using, possessing, or storing dangerous chemical, fireworks, or explosives.
    • Using, possessing, or storing any object classified as a weapon by the State of North Carolina on college property, except as allowed under North Carolina law with a concealed carry permit.
    • Utilizing any instrument in a manner that endangers or tends to endanger any person.
    • Obstructing the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic.
    • The use of skateboards, in-line skates, or other similar devices on the campus is prohibited.
    • Failing to comply with the reasonable and lawful directions of COA officials and COA campus security.
    • Falsely alerting others about an emergency.
  25. Sexual Misconduct: Sexual misconduct includes, but is not limited to: sexual violence including sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, sexual assault, and sexual exploitation.
     
    See the Title IX Policy for complete details and definitions.
  26. Stalking: A course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for her, his, or others’ safety, or to suffer substantial emotional distress is prohibited.
     
    See the Title IX Policy for complete details and definitions.
  27. Threatening Behavior: Prohibited conduct includes, but is not limited to:
    • Any written or oral communication, conduct or gesture, that is directed toward any member of the COA community including, but not limited to: students, faculty, staff, vendors, customers or guests, including to oneself, that causes a reasonable apprehension of physical harm to a person or property.
    • Interference by force, threat, harassment or duress with personal safety, academic efforts, employment, and/or participation in college-sponsored activities.
    • Includes any conduct that threatens or causes physical injury or endangers another person’s or one’s own health or safety including, but not limited to: physical violence, assault, or the threat to use physical violence; use or possession of fireworks, gunpowder, dangerous chemicals, or explosive materials; and blocking or preventing the use of or access to fire exit doors and building hallways, etc.

    Note: A student can be guilty of threatening behavior even if the person who is the object of the threat does not observe or receive it, so long as a reasonable person would interpret the maker’s statement, communication, conduct or gesture as a serious expression of intent to physically harm.

  28. Violation of the Tobacco Free Campus Policy: According to the Tobacco Free Campus policy, students shall not use, chew, smoke or sell tobacco products, e-cigarettes and/or medical marijuana, at any time while subject to the jurisdiction of the COA Student Code of Conduct or in any place on COA properties, including sidewalks within the boundaries of any COA campus. The policy shall extend to all properties owned, operated, leased or maintained by COA.
     
    See the Tobacco Free Campus Policy for complete details.
  29. Unauthorized Access and Use of Facilities and Services: Prohibited conduct includes, but is not limited to:
    • Unauthorized access or entry to college buildings, structures or facilities, information systems, or obtaining or providing to another person the means of such unauthorized access.
    • Unauthorized possession, duplication or use of keys or access codes for any college property.
    • Continued occupation of any college facility after being requested to leave by a college employee, official or designee acting in the performance of their duties.
  30. Violations of College Rules, Procedures and Policies: Students are responsible for making themselves aware of and complying with college policies and guidelines, which can be found in the Student Code of Conduct and Academic Integrity student handbook.
  31. Violation of Local, State or Federal Laws: All students must comply with the applicable law. Students shall not engage in conduct that violates any municipal or county ordinance, federal or state law, including, but not limited to: laws governing alcoholic beverages, drugs, gambling, sex offenses, indecent conduct, arson, copyright laws, etc. The disciplinary process may be instituted without regard to the pendency of civil or criminal litigation in court or criminal arrest and prosecution. Sanctions imposed as a part of this process shall not be subject to change based on the outcome of any criminal process.
     
    Note: Students under 18 years of age who are involved in acts of violence, drugs, and alcohol or sexual assault violations may have their parents notified by Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management or designee.
  1. Definition of Sanctions: Sanctions are disciplinary penalties that may be imposed on a student following a determination that the student has engaged in one or more code violations described in section II.
  2. Sanctions Determined on a Case-by-Case Basis: The determination of what sanctions may be warranted in a given situation will be based on the specifics of that situation and the student’s prior disciplinary record.
  3. Employees Authorized to Impose Sanctions: Employees authorized to impose sanctions include, and are limited to, the following:
    1. An instructor may impose academic ethics sanctions for an academic ethics violation involving the instructor’s course.
    2. An instructor may also impose an immediate suspension, not to exceed two class days, for classroom misconduct. This sanction must be immediately reported to the instructor’s supervisor, the Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management and Campus Security.
    3. A Campus Dean/Administrator may also impose an immediate suspension, not to exceed two class days. This sanction must be immediately reported to the Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management and Campus Security.
    4. The Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management may impose sanctions other than academic ethics sanctions.
    5. A college Campus Security Officer may impose a temporary, two days suspension, which will be immediately reported to the Director of Campus Safety and Security.
  4. Code of Conduct Sanctions: Sanctions other than academic sanctions mean any one or more of the sanctions set out below. Where appropriate, a student may be subject to more than one sanction. For example, a student may be on probation, have an obligation to pay restitution, and be on a behavior contract at the same time.
  5. Reprimand: A reprimand admonishes a student for a Code of Conduct violation and warns the student not to commit further violations. A reprimand must be in writing and becomes part of the student’s permanent discipline record.
  6. Probation: Probation is a written directive to comply strictly with the Code of Conduct for a specified period of time. A student on probation is permitted to continue with his or her coursework and attend college events and activities, but is warned that any further code violation may result in the imposition of more severe sanctions, including possible suspension or expulsion.
  7. Interim Suspension: An interim suspension is a suspension imposed by the Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management or Director of Campus Safety and Security on a student prior to the student’s receipt of due process procedures.
  8. Mandated Withdrawal: A mandated withdrawal is a sanction where the student is withdrawn from a class or classes or from a college program. Withdrawal of a student from a college program can be for a specified amount of time.
  9. Suspension: Suspension is a sanction that, for a specified period of time, (a) requires a student not to be on any college campus or property; (b) excludes the student from all college academic courses and activities; and (c) prohibits the student from attending or participating in any college event or activity, regardless of location. A suspension shall not exceed five (5) years in length. In appropriate situations, a limited suspension may be imposed. A limited suspension is one that restricts a student from some, but not all, academic classes.
     
    A suspension is a limited suspension only if it is expressly referenced as such in the decision that imposes the suspension. A student’s readmission following a suspension may be conditioned on compliance with specified conditions.
  10. Dismissal: Dismissal is the permanent exclusion of a student from (a) all college campuses and property; (b) all academic courses and activities of the college; and (c) the right to attend or participate in any college function or activity, regardless of location.
  11. Restitution: Restitution involves the payment of monies to the college or to one or more persons, groups, or organizations to compensate the person(s), group(s), or organization(s) for damage to property or costs incurred as a result of the student’s code violation. Before requiring restitution in a code matter that also involves separate criminal charges, the Director of Campus Safety and Security shall consult with the local police.
  12. Access Restrictions: Access Restrictions are restrictions on a student’s ability to attend or access specific services, facilities, and/or extracurricular activities or events. An access restriction shall not include prohibiting a student from attending a class or classes in which the student is enrolled.
  13. Service and Related Activities: A student may be required to complete an educational program at the student’s expense, write a paper or letter of apology, or engage in educational or community service appropriate to a specific code violation.
  14. Administrative Hold: An administrative hold is a sanction that precludes a student from registering, receiving transcripts, or graduating until clearance has been received from the college President or Vice President of Student Success and Enrollment Management based on the student’s completion of specified conditions, such as the return of property, completion of community service obligations, payment of restitution, etc. An administrative hold may only be imposed on a student when the student has received one of the following disciplinary sanctions:
    1. a suspension;
    2. mandated withdrawal of the student from a class or classes, or from a college program;
    3. a dismissal;
    4. restitution requirements; or
    5. service-related activities requirements.

A. Academic Integrity Violations

The development, understanding and practice of integrity and academic honesty are expected of all students at the college. Personal integrity is important in all aspects of life, and students are expected to conduct themselves with honesty and integrity, both in and out of the classroom. Acts of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated, and students engaging in such conduct may be subject to classroom and/or institutional disciplinary actions.
 
Academic dishonesty is any form of cheating and/or plagiarism which results in students giving or receiving unauthorized assistance in an academic exercise or receiving credit for work which is not their own.

  1. Cheating: Cheating includes, but is not limited to the following:
    • Using any sources not authorized by the faculty member (textbooks, notes, websites, the work of other students) to complete examinations or other assignments.
    • Giving or receiving content information relating to assignments/quizzes/test/examinations to/from others unless authorized by the instructor.
    • Using unauthorized electronic equipment.
    • Submitting academic work previously submitted in another course without authorization.
    • Altering or tampering with grades.
  2. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is intentional or unintentional use of the intellectual creations of another source, person or organization without proper attribution. Credit must be given for every direct quotation, for paraphrasing or summarizing a work (in whole, or in part, in one’s own words), and for information that is not common knowledge. Plagiarism may take two main forms, which are clearly related:
    • Stealing or passing off as one’s own the ideas or words, images, or other creative works of another.
    • Using a creative production without crediting the source, even if only minimal information is available to identify it for citation.
  3. Fabrication: Fabrication is defined as intentionally falsifying or inventing any information or citation on any academic exercise. Therefore:
    • “Invented” information may not be used in any laboratory experiment or academic exercise.
    • One should acknowledge the actual source from which cited information is obtained.
    • Students must not change or resubmit previous academic work without prior permission of the instructor.
  4. Other Examples of Academic Dishonesty
    • Allowing another student to copy during a test;
    • Giving homework, term paper or other academic work to another student to plagiarize;
    • Submitting any work that is not one’s own;
    • Falsifying information to a faculty member or college official;
    • Altering a graded work after it has been returned, then submitting the work for re-grading without the instructor’s knowledge/approval;
    • Stealing tests or other assessment items;
    • Forging signatures on college documentation;
    • Giving false or misleading information to a faculty member in an effort to receive a postponement or an extension on a test or other assignment;
    • Accessing computerized college records or systems without authorization;
    • Providing material or information to another person with knowledge that such aid could be used in any of the violations stated above;
    • Unauthorized recording, reproduction, retransmission or redistribution of course materials (e.g. lectures, handouts, podcasts, exams, student projects, group work, online material, etc.);
    • Unauthorized use of solutions manuals, test bank or test bank materials for homework or exams.

B. Academic Integrity Sanctions

  1. Employees Authorized to Impose Academic Sanctions: Employees authorized to impose sanctions include, and are limited to, the following:
     
    An instructor may impose academic ethics sanctions for an academic ethics violation involving the instructor’s course.
  2. Academic Ethics Sanctions: Academic ethics sanctions mean any of the following:
    • Warning: A warning admonishes a student for an academic ethics violation and warns the student not to commit further violations. A warning must be in writing but does not become part of the student’s permanent record.
    • Loss of Credit or Grade Reduction on an Assignment: A student may be given a lower or failing grade (including a grade of zero or no credit) on an assignment, test/quiz or project which was the subject of an academic ethics violation.
    • Loss of Credit or Withdrawal from the Course: A student may lose credit for the course or be withdrawn, depending on the severity of an academic ethics violation.
  3. Appeals Process: see section VI of this policy for appeal policy details.